Find Locations and Conditions of Bridges and Structures

Learn about the condition of a number of bridges and structures in Toronto. Click on any bridge or structure located on the map and find out its age, year of last inspection, inspection results, and next inspection year. The information provided in this web tool is for bridges and structures managed by the City of Toronto (City) and the Province of Ontario-Ministry of Transportation (MTO). Information is updated annually after each cycle of inspections is completed and processed. Available photos of the bridges and structures are also posted.

Alternative Method for Finding Information in the Web Map

Accessible version of the data in MS-Excel file format is available in the City of Toronto Open Data Catalogue.

Understanding Inspections and Results for City-managed Bridges and Structures

Like all infrastructure, bridges and structures require ongoing maintenance. Routine inspections help the City ensure that its bridges and structures are well maintained and repairs occur at the best time in the bridge’s or structure’s life cycle. In addition, each bridge or structure managed by the City Engineering & Construction Services and MTO undergo routine inspection every two years. Results from these inspections are added together and the bridge or structure is given an overall rating based on the Bridge Condition Index (BCI).

City Parks, Forestry & Recreation (PF&R) pedestrian bridges and structures undergo general inspections on a regular basis and detailed assessments every five years. Based on the results of these inspections, each Parks’ pedestrian bridge or structure is given an overall rating based on its Condition Rating (CR).

Criteria used to generate bridges and structures overall ratings as Good, Fair, or Poor based on BCI or CR are illustrated in the table below.

 

Rating Index Criteria
  Good

BCI:

70 -100

For a bridge or structure with a BCI 70 or greater (up to 100), maintenance work is not usually required within the next five years.

CR:

0.0 – 0.3

 For a PF&R pedestrian bridge or structure with a CR 0.0 or greater and less than 0.4, major maintenance work is not usually required within the next ten years.
Fair

BCI:

60 – 69

For a bridge or structure with a BCI 60 or greater and less than 70, the maintenance work is usually scheduled within the next five  years. This is the ideal time to schedule major bridge or structure repairs from an economic perspective.

CR:

0.4 – 0.7

 For a PF&R pedestrian bridge or structure with a CR 0.4 or greater and less than 0.8, major maintenance work is usually scheduled within the next five years.
   Poor

BCI:

0 – 59

 For a bridge or structure with a BCI rating of less than 60, maintenance work is usually scheduled within approximately one year. A  poor rating does not necessarily mean the bridge or structure is unsafe or unsuitable for use. It may mean that repairs are needed to improve its  rating to Fair or Good.

 CR:

0.8 or Greater

 For a PF&R pedestrian bridge or structure with a CR 0.8 or greater, maintenance work is usually scheduled within the short term. A  poor  rating does not necessarily mean the parks’ pedestrian bridge or structure is unsafe or unsuitable for use. It may mean that  repairs are  needed to improve its rating to Fair or Good.
 Immediate action will be taken to address any safety concerns on all bridges and structures.

Planned Construction Work on City-managed Bridges and Structures

The City has plans to work on a number of bridges in the coming years. Learn about planned capital repairs by visiting T.O. INview.

The Ontario Ministry of Transportation (MTO) performs routine inspections of their bridges, some of which are in Toronto. Details of MTO program can be found by visiting Ontario Bridge Repairs and Inspections Information.

Frequently Asked Questions about City of Toronto Bridges and Structures

Why does the City have this web tool?

The City of Toronto (City) staff were directed by the Public Works and Infrastructure Committee to create a tool that would inform residents about the City’s bridges and their most recent inspection. This web-based tool meets that direction and is designed to keep the public informed. Public Works and Infrastructure Committee decision can be found from the Adopted Motion PW26.9

Are all bridges in Toronto listed in this tool?

If you are unable to find a bridge or a structure from this web tool it could mean the bridge or structure you are looking for is not owned or maintained by the City of Toronto (City) or the Ontario Ministry of Transportation (MTO). The City is working with other groups such as Metrolinx, TTC, CN, CPR, and private owners to share their bridge information for this tool. When that information is made available, it will be added.

What is a ‘structure’?

For the purpose of providing information in this web tool, the term ‘structure’ is defined as constructed items that are used by the public in the City of Toronto. This web tool provides information about the following structures: bridges with the span of 3 metres or more, culverts with an opening of 3 metres or more, and the elevated components of the F.G. Gardiner Expressway.

What does City-managed bridge mean?

City-managed bridges are those that the City has complete or partial ownership. There are a number of bridges in Toronto that are not owned by the City of Toronto. For example, most of the bridges or overpasses over 400-series highways are owned and maintained by the Ontario Ministry of Transportation (MTO). The detailed information of MTO program can be found at Ontario Bridge Repairs and Inspections Information . Other groups that own or maintain bridges in Toronto include Metrolinx, TTC, CN, CPR, and private owners.

What is the Bridge Condition Index (BCI)?

The BCI rating is a planning tool developed by the Ontario Ministry of Transportation that helps the City schedule maintenance and rehabilitation work. The BCI is not used to rate or indicate the safety of a bridge or structure. The BCI results are organized into ranges from 0 to 100. The breakdown for the conditions is explained in the understanding inspections & results section. To calculate the BCI rating, the current dollar value of the bridge or structure is divided by the replacement cost of the bridge or structure. The replacement value is based on the cost to reconstruct a new bridge or structure.

What is the Condition Rating (CR)?

The CR is a planning tool used by the City of Toronto Parks, Forestry & Recreation (PR&R) that helps the City schedule maintenance and rehabilitation work of PR&R pedestrian bridges and structures. To calculate the CR, the sum of the 10 years capital cost is divided by the replacement cost. CR results are organized into ranges from 0.0 to 0.8. The breakdown for the conditions is explained in the understanding inspections & results section.

Why does the City use the Bridge Condition Index (BCI) and the Condition Rating (CR)?

The City uses the BCI and CR formulas so capital work planning staff can make informed decisions about the amount of work a bridge or structure requires and whether or not to pursue replacement over repair in the near future; ensuring capital investments for bridges and structures are a responsible use of public funds.

I want to know if a bridge or structure is safe. Does the BCI or CR tell me that?

The BCI or CR does not directly indicate if a bridge or structure is safe; it does indicate the general state of repair or condition of a bridge or structure. Routine inspections help staff collect information about a bridge or structure and highlights areas requiring maintenance or further investigation. Public safety is paramount to the City. If an inspection indicates a bridge’s or structure’s safety is at risk, staff will take appropriate measures to address the concern and if necessary close the bridge or structure until such time repairs can be completed.

How many bridges & structures are there in the City?

Including the F.G. Gardiner Expressway, the City of Toronto’s Engineering & Construction Services maintains 1055 bridges & structures; Parks, Forestry & Recreation maintains 259 bridges & structures located in Parks. The Ontario Ministry of Transportation (MTO) maintains 325 bridges in 400-series highways in the City. There are many other bridges in the City owned by other agencies.

How are bridges & structures inspected?

The Ontario Ministry of Transportation has developed an overview about bridges in the Province of Ontario and what parts of bridges are inspected. The City of Toronto abides by the same standards for the 1055 bridges & structures managed by Engineering & Construction Services (ECS). Maintenance inspections are completed once a year. Learn more about bridge inspections on the Ministry of Transportation’s website at Ontario Bridge Repairs and Inspections Information. All ECS managed bridges & structures are inspected every two years. Parks, Forestry & Recreation (PF&R) managed pedestrian bridges & structures in Parks undergo general maintenance inspections on a regular basis. Detailed assessments for updating the PF&R bridge and structure condition rating are being updated to a two year inspection period. Currently detailed inspections of some bridges and structures are beyond two years, but by the end of 2017 those detailed inspections will be updated to a two year basis.

How does the City prioritize bridges & structures rehabilitation and repairs?

The Bridge Condition Index (BCI) and Condition Rating (CR) are some of the tools that help the City prioritize repairs; timing repairs correctly means investing in repair work to keep a bridge or a structure in a state of good repair. Other factors like the location of bridge or structure and the available budget help the plan work in a coordinated manner. For example, if a bridge or a structure needed some repair work, it would be timed so that it wouldn’t interfere with other City work nearby and would be scheduled to a better time to reduce the impact of the work on the commuting public.

How often will you update this web tool?

The information used in this tool is updated yearly with the most current inspection and best available information from all agencies whose bridges & structures are presented in this web page.

Why does the City print numbers on bridges & structures?

City staff paint the ‘Structure Id’ numbers on the City-managed bridges & structures. City’s Transportation Services have done this work to assist in identifying the exact bridge or structure when specifically identifying any maintenance or inspection needs. The City manages a significant number of bridges & structures and having the ‘Structure Id’ painted on the bridges & structures avoids any confusion when dealing with bridges & structures in close proximity to each other.

What is a ‘bent’?

‘Bents’ are concrete or steel column sections of the F.G. Gardiner Expressway that are partially visible above ground. They include various components such as underground piles and footings, the above ground columns, and the concrete beams connecting the north side columns to the south side columns. Each bent has an assigned number which provides a useful way to identify specific sections of the F.G. Gardiner Expressway while undertaking inspections and coordinating maintenance projects.

I would like to report a concern about a City-managed bridge or structure, how can I do that?

If you have concerns about a City-managed bridge or structure, please contact the City of Toronto 311 Services citing the ‘Structure Id’ and ‘Location Description’ provided in this web tool and explain your concerns to the 311 operator taking the call.

City of Toronto 311 Services:
Phone within Toronto city limits: 311
Phone outside city limits: 416-392-2489
TTY customers: 416-338-0889
E-mail: 311@toronto.ca

I have additional questions about bridges & structures in Toronto, whom can I contact?

We encourage you to contact the City of Toronto 311 Services with your questions; the 311 operator will direct your call to the appropriate staff person for follow up.

All information in this web page is subject to change without notice.